1099 Whitbread Ale

  • Item #Y34
  • Price: $6.99
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The original Whitbread strain from England. Mildly malty and slightly fruity, not as tart as the 1098 British Ale strain, and more flocculant. High flocculation, attenuation: 68-72% Ideal temperature range: 64-75° F.
(3)
Average rating 8.33333333333334 out of 10 ( based on 3 reviews )

YEAST METHODOLOGY

Review by MILES W. on 3/10/2008

Pros: Easy to roast, tastes good at almost any roast level.

Cons: would be nice in 5lb bags

Cons: THESE POUCHES ARE DIFFICULT TO TIME WHEN THE YEAST IS READY. INCONSISTENT. BETTER TO PREPARE A YEAST STARTER.

Really Can't Ask For Much More...

Review by Justin B. on 11/24/2008

Pros: Whitbread is a solid workhorse strain. I've used it for two types of stout, and could see it being great for just about any English style. The first time I used it, I grossly under-pitched an oatmeal stout (just one activator pack in a 1.60, 5 gallon brew...long story), and it still started fermenting within 12 hours, and finished completely in 4 days (although I left it in the primary for 4 weeks to condition). Flocculation is very high, making it easy to take cake samples to start starters. I've only done stouts with it, but this would not require filtration in a lighter brew. Whitbread is well-behaved, in the sense that it doesn't blow off airlocks or "boil over." Regarding Miles' comments: pop the inner sack, shake periodically over 8-12 hours, then use the slurry to inoculate a starter. There's nothing wrong with the Wyeast system in my eyes, and my experience with their strains has been first rate thus far.

Cons: None.

Great Yeast and Attenuation

Review by Shawn on 7/27/2013

This is a fast working yeast with good attenuation. I used it for my last three batches (the last 2 washed) and it it fast and furious. Usually getting about 78% attenuation when fermenting at 66-68 or so. Even though it does a nice job with a complete fermentation it leaves a nice malt footprint on the beer. Also drops clear and bright in the fermenter. Use it when you need some more of the malt flavor in the finished product over an American Ale yeast. Prost!

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